Elements of a Hyperscale Data Center

Sept. 19, 2017
Hyperscale has come to mean a lot of things, but at its core is the ability to scale all elements of IT architecture and provision rapidly to meet demand as it increases. This is the final of three entries in a Data Center Frontier series and focuses on the different elements of a hyperscale data center.

This is the final of three entries in a Data Center Frontier series that explores how hyperscale will disrupt the data center market. This series, compiled in a complete Guide, also covers understanding major hyperscale trends and how to select a hyperscale parnter. The below post focuses on the different elements of a hyperscale data center.

Download the full report.

A new service model that has emerged from this increase in demand: Hyperscale Service Provider (HSP). Hyperscale has come to mean a lot of things, but at its core is the ability to scale all elements of IT architecture and provision rapidly to meet demand as it increases.

This is where QTS Data Centers, hyperscale data center and HSP, combines both maturity and innovation. This is required to help a business meet and exceed their growth strategies. When it comes to working with a hyperscale service provider—QTS delivers:

  • Speed Hyperscale companies require an optimal mix that includes speed of deployment and speed of daily operations. Often needing fast provisioning of 2, 6, 20, or 50+ megawatts, these companies need a partner with the inventory and scale to match their needs. In addition to time of delivery, Hyperscale companies have a need for speed that spans logistics (dock to rack), contracting, access to information, maintenance, incident resolution and reporting, among a myriad of other requirements.
  • Flexibility A good HSP will quickly understand that their customers are operating at the speed of the Internet. There are nuances in their business model that require flexibility that covers power delivery, usage, contracting, SLA’s, and day-to-day data center operations. Furthermore, HSP will be able to adapt, at the pace of the industry, to your specific data and cloud demands.
  • Competitive Economics Data center value extends well past the cost per kW. Hyperscale customers require predictability and tremendous economic value around Total Cost of Ownership (TCO). The best hyperscale data center service providers understand what it takes to operate at scale. This knowledge, combined with the ability to spread costs across a large inventory, enables customers to garner value in upfront pricing and the ongoing operational costs of their environments.

The best hyperscale data center service providers understand what it takes to operate at scale. This knowledge, combined with the ability to spread costs across a large inventory, enables customers to garner value in upfront pricing and the ongoing operational costs of their environments.

  • Proven Operational Excellence Hyperscale companies need a partner that can deliver the same operational excellence that they have come to expect from their own centers. Hyperscale Service Providers like QTS not only deliver on capability, they also carry an industry-leading NPS scores as a testament to the importance placed on process, procedure and customer communication.
  • Ultimate Visibility Transparency spanning the delivery of important usage data can be accomplished via QTS Service Delivery Platform (SDP); where you’ll understand time to provisioning, maintenance windows —all the way to a simple and clear understanding of pricing/billing. Furthermore, none of this can be complicated. A good HSP will take the time to make your most critical business processes efficient, and much easier to execute.

This series on  hyperscale data centers will also cover the following topics:

You can also download the complete report, “Data Center Frontier Special Report: How Hyperscale Will Disrupt the Data Center Market,” courtesy of QTS. 

About the Author

Bill Kleyman

Bill Kleyman is a veteran, enthusiastic technologist with experience in data center design, management and deployment. Bill is currently a freelance analyst, speaker, and author for some of our industry's leading publications.

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